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ATom: In Situ Airborne State Parameters, 2016-2018

Submitted by ORNL DAAC Staff on 2021-11-20
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MMS instrumentation on the DC-8 aircraft during the fourth field campaign in the NASA Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX) series.
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MMS instrumentation on the DC-8 aircraft during the fourth field campaign in the NASA Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX) series.

The ORNL DAAC recently released the following Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom) dataset by Bui, T.P., et al. (2021):

ATom: Measurements from Meteorological Measurement System (MMS), 2016-2018

This dataset contains measurements from the Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) instrument from the four ATom campaigns. MMS is a state-of-the-art instrument for measuring accurate, high resolution in situ airborne state parameters (pressure, temperature, turbulence index, and the 3-dimensional wind vector). These key measurements enable our understanding of atmospheric dynamics, chemistry, and microphysical processes. The MMS is used to investigate atmospheric mesoscale (gravity and mountain lee waves) and microscale (turbulence) phenomena. An accurate characterization of the turbulence phenomenon is important for the understanding of dynamic processes in the atmosphere, such as the behavior of buoyant plumes within cirrus clouds, diffusions of chemical species within wake vortices generated by jet aircraft, and microphysical processes in breaking gravity waves. Accurate temperature and pressure data are needed to evaluate chemical reaction rates as well as to determine accurate mixing ratios. Accurate wind field data establish a detailed relationship with the various constituents and the measured wind also verifies numerical models used to evaluate air mass origin.

The Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom) is a NASA Earth Venture Suborbital-2 mission to study the impact of human-produced air pollution on greenhouse gases and on chemically reactive gases in the atmosphere. ATom deployed an extensive gas and aerosol payload on the NASA DC-8 aircraft for systematic, global-scale sampling of the atmosphere, profiling continuously from 0.2 to 12 km altitude. Around-the-world flights were conducted in each of four seasons between 2016 and 2018.

Additional data from ATom and other relevant links can be found on the ORNL DAAC's ATom Project Page.

Citation: Bui, T.P. 2021. ATom: Measurements from Meteorological Measurement System (MMS), 2016-2018. ORNL DAAC, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. https://doi.org/10.3334/ORNLDAAC/1731

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