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How will climate change shift the tundra - taiga interface?

MODIS true-color, cloud-free composite of the northern hemisphere in 2001.

MODIS true-color, cloud-free composite of the northern hemisphere in 2001. The circumpolar taiga–tundra ecotone benchmarked in this study is about 13,400 km long (Image source: NASA).

Ranson et al. used MODIS data to map tree cover at the Earth's longest vegetation transition zone.

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ORNL DAAC User Working Group

May 2016 UWG Meeting at Goddard Space Flight Center

May 2016 UWG Meeting at Goddard Space Flight Center

The ORNL DAAC User Working Group met at Goddard Space Flight Center on May 23rd - 25th, 2016.

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Tracking changes in Arctic Permafrost

Large sections of exposed permafrost are visible after a portion of Alaska's coastal tundra collapsed. (Photo by USGS Alaska Science Center.)

Large sections of exposed permafrost are visible after a portion of Alaska's coastal tundra collapsed. (Photo by USGS Alaska Science Center.)

The warming of permafrost soils is expected to increase methane and carbon dioxide emissions.

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Burned but not forgotten

Eleven years after the Charlton Fire in Oregon’s Willamette National Forest, snags are standing and new vegetation is growing. (Courtesy M. Spencer)

In this photograph, taken eleven years after the Charlton Fire in Oregon’s Willamette National Forest, a majority of snags still stand while gradually new vegetation is growing. (Courtesy M. Spencer)

Decades after a fire, high-elevation forests still shape the climate.

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Cities, traffic, and CO2

Tons of CO2 emitted from vehicles in 2012 from the Database of Road Transportation Emissions

Tons of CO2 emitted from vehicles in 2012 from the Database of Road Transportation Emissions.

Covering 33 years of traffic across the U.S. on a one-kilometer grid, the new DARTE inventory offers a baseline for efforts to limit carbon dioxide emissions.

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