Skip to main content
ORNL DAAC HomeNASA Home

DAAC Home > About Us >

You are here

News

News

ABoVE

Feedbacks Between Climate and Alaskan Wildlife

A researcher collects data on snowpack properties in Alaska.

Anne Nolin collects data on snowpack properties as part of a NASA ABoVE study examining how changing snow conditions affect Dall sheep in Wrangell St-Elias National Park, 20 March 2017. (Photo courtesy of Laura Prugh)

Scientists with NASA's ABoVE field campaign are studying links between snowpack properties and Dall sheep populations and movement.

Carbon Emissions from Boreal Forest Megafires

the NWT megafire complex

Field measurements were collected in seven spatially independent burn scars, within the Yellowknife megafire complex, which had burned between June and August 2014.

New data from NASA's ABoVE field campaign provide estimates of carbon emissions from the 2014 NWT mega-fire complex.

Wildfire Burn Severity Across Alaska and Canada

30-m dNBR for a burn scar in ABoVE grid tile Bh05Bv03

The differenced Normalized Burned Ratio (dNBR) for a burn scar from fires in 2015 within ABoVE grid tile Bh05Bv03. A higher dNBR indicates a higher fire severity.

New data from NASA's ABoVE campaign provides a high-resolution record of differenced Normalized Burned Ratio (dNBR) for fires from 1985-2015.

Year-round Data from Alaskan Flux Towers

Three tower sites at Barrow, Alaska

Three tower sites at Barrow, Alaska: Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) tower, Biocomplexity Experiment, South (BES) tower, and the Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) tower.

NASA's ABoVE campaign provides year-round CO2, CH4, and meteorology at five sites on Alaska's North Slope.

Modeled WRF-STILT Footprints for Barrow, Alaska

Plot of the footnearfield1 variable for 0.1 degree gridded STILT footprint model output for August 15,1982 near the receptor location at Barrow, Alaska.

Plot of the 0.1 degree gridded STILT footprint model output for August 15, 1982 near the receptor location at Barrow, Alaska. This variable provides 24 hours of surface influence representing the response of the receptor to a unit surface emission (ppm/umol m-2 s-1) of CO2 in each grid cell within a small region close to the measurement location. (From the data file foot1982x08x15x06x00x71.3230Nx156.6114Wx00016.nc)

Land surface influence on atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations in Barrow, Alaska was simulated for 12 selected years from 1982 to 2011 as part of the ABoVE campaign.

Pages